45 Best Lesbian Books in 2024

Before we publish our list of our best lesbian books let’s delve on the history of LGBT literature. Gay or Queer literature has been around for a long time. It is literature that is produced by or for the gay community and includes themes, characters, or plot lines related to their queer gender identity and sexuality.

Usually, queer literature overlaps with other genres as feminist literature as they encompass a wide range of narratives that challenge traditional gender roles.

For centuries, queer literature has offered representation and advocacy for queer communities. To this day, Queer literature is challenged in many countries, developed and developing, because they don’t fall in line with social and legal customs.

Sl. No.Best Lesbian Books 2024
1)Fingersmith by Sarah Waters
2)Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg
3)Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden
4)The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith
5)The Colour Purple by Alice Walker
6)Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
7)Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters
8)The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer
9)The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth
10)Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst
11)Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown
12)Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour
13)Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café by Fannie Flagg
14)The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez
15)The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
16)Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan
17)Sing You Home by Jodi Picoult
18)Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado
19)The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall
20)Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta
21)Ask, Tell by E.J. Noyes
22)Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde
23)Ash by Malinda Lo
24)Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anne Peters
25)Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson
26)Reservations of the Heart by T.B. Markinson
27)Jericho by Ann McMan
28)Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera
29)The Night Off by Meghan O’Brien
30)The Summer of Jordi Perez (And the Best Burger in Los Angeles) by Amy Spalding
31)Women by Chloe Caldwell
32)Jam on the Vine by LaShonda Barnett
33)The Gifts of the Body by Rebecca Brown
34)Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley
35)People in Trouble by Sarah Schulman
36)One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston
37)The Girls in 3B by Valeria Taylor
38)When Sparks Fly by Kristen Zimmer
39)Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur
40)No Rings Attached
41)The Sea of Light by Jenifer Levin
42)Lena by Cassie Pruyn
43)Stars Collide by Rachel Lacey
44)Delilah Green Doesn’t Care by Ashley Herring Blake
45)Astrid Parker Doesn’t Fail by Ashley Herring Blake

With the expression of homosexuality still banned or illegal in many countries, LGBTQ literature is often censored and receives pushback from publishers.

However, the pushback hasn’t stopped writers such as Sarah Waters, Jeanette Winterson, Alice Walker, Hames Baldwin, Oscar Wilde, and E. M. Forster to write queer literature that hoped to push social boundaries and bring the plight of queer people to prominence.

Some classic examples of queer literature are- The Colour Purple by Alice Walker, Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin, A Single Man by Christopher Isherwood, the Picture of Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde, Maurice by E. M. Forster, and The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst.

Best Lesbian Books

1) Fingersmith by Sarah Waters

Fingersmith by Sarah Waters

Fingersmith is a 2002 novel set in Victorian-era Britain by Sarah Waters. The book follows Sue Trinder, an orphan left in the care of Mrs. Sucksby as an infant. Mrs. Sucksby raised Sue with unusual tenderness. Mrs. Sucksby hosts a transient family of petty thieves.

One day, an elegant con man approaches Sue with an enticing proposition: If Sue wins the position of Maud Lilly’s maid and helps the con man seduce her, then both of them can share Maud’s vast inheritance. Sue agrees to the plan only because she wishes to repay the kindness of her adopted family.

2) Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg

Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg

Published in 1993, Stone Butch Blues is a historical fiction novel written by Leslie Feinberg. The book is centered around the life of a butch lesbian in 1970s America.

The protagonist of the book is Jess Goldberg, whose parents are frustrated with her gender non-conformity. So much so that they institutionalize Jess in a psychiatric ward for three weeks.

As she grows older, she learns about a gay bar where she meets drag queens, femmes, and butches. There, she meets other lesbians who teach her about lesbian roles and culture. She drops out of school after she is gang-raped by football players.

Jess continues to struggle with her gender identity and soon starts taking testosterone. Stone Butch Blues is considered an important piece of LGBT literature.

3) Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden

Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden

Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden is a 1982 romantic novel. The book is set in New York City and revolves around the romantic relationship between two 17-year-old girls, Annie and Liza. Liza, the narrator and protagonist of the novel, lives in an upscale neighborhood in Brooklyn Heights.

She wishes to become an architect and attend MIT. On the other hand, Annie is the daughter of Italian immigrants and lives in a shabby neighborhood. She is a wonderful singer and loves growing plants. Even though they have strikingly different backgrounds and dreams, the two girls share a close friendship that turns into romance. 

4) The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith

The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith

Published in 1952 by Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt, or Carol, is a romantic novel. The book follows Therese Belivet, a young woman who is looking for opportunities to start her career as a set designer. Therese is dating Richard, a man with whom she is neither intellectually nor sexually compatible.

While working at a department store, Therese becomes enamored with an older woman, Carol, who is going through a divorce. The women soon discover that they have romantic and sexual feelings for each other.

The Price of Salt became an extremely popular book among lesbians in the 1950s due to its unconventional characters and relatively non-tragic ending.

5) The Colour Purple by Alice Walker

The Colour Purple by Alice Walker

Published in 1982, The Colour Purple by American author Alice Walker is a novel written as a series of letters. The book won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction.

It is set in the early 1900s and tells the story of Celie, a poor teenage African-American girl living in rural Georgia. Celie writes letters to God recounting the times her father and her husband sexually and physically abuse her.

Although The Colour Purple has gained critical acclaim, it is still the subject of controversy due to its sexually explicit nature and depictions of homosexuality and violence.

The novel was adapted into a film by Steven Spielberg. It stars Whoopie Goldberg, Danny Glover, and Oprah Winfrey. A new film adaptation based on the musical will be released in 2023 as well.

6) Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson is a coming-of-age story about a young girl who grows up in an evangelical community. The main protagonist, Jeanette, belongs to an English Pentecostal community. For the longest time, she has believed that she will grow up to be a missionary.

However, as she grows older, she finds herself attracted to another girl, and this causes her to be the subject of exorcisms. The core themes of the book are the concept of faith, family dynamics, gaining wisdom as we grow older, and same-sex relationships.

7) Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters

Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters

Published in 1998, Tipping the Velvet by Sara Waters follows Nan King, a young girl who is enamored by a male impersonator. When she finally gets to meet her, she becomes her dresser and soon becomes a dancing double act. They also admit their romantic feelings towards each other, which leads to an affair.

8) The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer

The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer

Published in 2013, The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer tells the story of Kendall Bettencourt. Kendall Bettencourt is one of Hollywood’s hottest young stars who craves normality. Her refuge from the crazy celebrity life is her best friend, Payton Taylor. Therefore, she moves her to LA to keep her sane. For Payton, Kendall is more than a friend; she is the only girl she has ever loved.

9) The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth is a coming-of-age teen novel. Published in 2012, The Miseducation of Cameron Post tells the story of Cameron Post, a 12-year-old who is coming into her own sexuality.

After her parents are killed in a car crash, she starts living with her conservative aunt and her grandmother. When they learn about her homosexual proclivities, they send her to a conversion camp.

There, she makes new friends with whom she can be herself. The book was adapted into a film with Chloe Grace Moretz starring as Cameron Post.

10) Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst

Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst

Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst is a fantasy fiction novel published in 2016. Princess Dennaleia knows exactly what her future holds. She is betrothed to the prince of Mynaria, as that will help seal the alliance between her homeland and Mynaria.

After her marriage, she is taught to ride Mynaria’s formidable warhorses by Princess Mare, the sister of her betrothed. As they spend more time with each other, their friendship starts to blossom into something more.

11) Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Published in 1973, Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown is known for its explicit portrayal of lesbianism. The novel has been described as an autobiographical account of Brown’s own youth and coming into her sexuality.

The novel focuses on Molly, a remarkably beautiful girl who has been aware of her lesbianism since early childhood. At school, Molly pushes herself academically in order to win a scholarship.

However, when authorities learn about her relationship with her roommate, they revoke her scholarship, which encourages her to move to New York, where she has her first experiences in lesbian communities.

12) Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour

Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour

If you are in the mood for a contemporary young adult novel that deals with LGBT, romance, and queer themes, then Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour is just the book for you.

Published in 2014, Everything Leads to You tells the story of Hollywood set designer Emi, who describes herself as a film buff and a true romantic.

A mysterious letter leads Emi to the beautiful and enigmatic Ava, who lives an unconventional life. With Ava’s help, Emi expands her understanding of true romance, family values, and acceptance.

13) Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café by Fannie Flagg

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café by Fannie Flagg

Published in 1987 by American author Fannie Flagg, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café follows the blossoming friendship between Evelyn, a middle-aged housewife, and Ninny, an elderly woman living in a nursing home. Every week Evelyn visits Ninny, who tells her stories from her youth in Whistle Stop, Alabama.

American author Harper Lee praised the book and its author, Fannie Flagg, for giving an accurate representation of the American South. One of the core themes of the novel is lesbianism and the effects of racism on society.

It also explores the moral justifications for euthanasia and murder. The book was adapted into an award-winning movie in 1991, with actors like Kathy Bates and Jessica Tandy playing the lead roles.

14) The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez

The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez

Jewelle Gomez is an American author and activist. She is revered for her activism on behalf of LGBT rights and for her long career in philanthropy. Incidentally, Gomez and her now-wife, Dr. Diane Sabin, were among the litigants who sued the state of California for the right to legal marriage. Her first novel was ‘The Gilda Stories,’ a 1991 speculative fiction vampire novel.

The book tells the experiences of a black lesbian vampire as she travels through time and leads multiple lives. In the first story, the protagonist is a runaway slave in Louisiana who is rescued by Gilda, a vampire who runs a brothel. There, she is educated by the women and introduced to a life of vampirism and eternal life. I really enjoyed this book as it covers the theme of female empowerment and sexuality in various contexts and time periods.

15) The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor Jenkins Reid is an American author of books like Malibu Rising, Daisy Jones and the Six, and The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. In her 2017 historical fiction novel, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, Reid tells the story of a fictional Old Hollywood star, Evelyn Hugo, who gives an interview to the journalist Monique Grant.

The book is split into seven parts, each named after one of Hugo’s husbands. As you read the book, you’ll pick up on who Reid’s influences for Hugo were, such as Elizabeth Taylor, Rita Hayworth, Tab Hunter, and Ava Gardner.

16) Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan

Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan

Natasha Ngan is an English writer of sci-fi and fantasy young adult fiction. Her third novel, Girls of Paper and Fire, tells the story of Lei and Wren, two of the eight human concubines of a demon king.

The novel uses their romantic relationship as a way of tackling topics such as homophobia, sexual assault, and the commodification of women’s bodies.

I highly recommend this fantasy young adult novel and its two sequels for people interested in reading about a forbidden love story between two women and their quest for justice and revenge.

17) Sing You Home by Jodi Picoult

Sing You Home by Jodi Picoult

Jodi Picoult is a New York Times best-selling author of books like Lone Wolf, Sing You Home, My Sister’s Keeper, and A Spark of Light. Her book Sing You Home explores what it means to be a homosexual in the present world and how reproductive science has advanced in recent years. It touches upon the issues same-sex couples face when getting married or while adopting.

The book follows Zoe Baxter, a bisexual music therapist who suffered fertility issues in her marriage and must fight for the right to use her frozen embryos when she meets Vanessa and they decide to have children together.

I highly recommend this book, as the story is told from multiple character perspectives and examines the influence of religion on the legal system.

18) Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

Carmen Maria Machado is an American essayist and literary critic best known for her 2017 short story collection, Her Body and Other Parties. Machado grew up in a religious household, which led to her feeling guilty about her queer sexuality.

In her debut novel, Her Body and Other Parties, Machado was able to combine the horror and science fiction genres with psychologically realistic and darkly comic themes.

Many critics have lauded the book for being joyful, original, and extremely subversive. The book is a collection of eight short stories: The Husband Stitch, Inventory, Mothers, Especially Heinous, Real Women Have Bodies, Eight Bites, The Resident, and Difficult at Parties.

19) The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall

The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall

Marguerite Antonia Radclyffe Hall was an English poet and author. For the majority of her adulthood, Radclyffe Hall went by the name John. Hall had inherited a vast wealth from her father, which she realized was enough for her to live without working or marrying. She also began dressing as a man and identifying as a lesbian.

Her novel, The Well of Loneliness, tells the story of Stephen Gordon, an upper-class Englishwoman whose homosexual proclivities are apparent from an early age.

Her romantic relationship with Mary Llewellyn is marred by social isolation and rejection. By publishing this book, Hall wanted to end the public silence about homosexuality and bring some understanding to their plight.

At the time of its release in 1928, the novel was criticized for defending lesbianism. To this date, The Well of Loneliness’ treatment of gender identity and sexuality continues to inspire study and debate.

20) Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta

Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta

Set in 1960s Nigeria, Under the Udala Trees is a novel by Nigerian-American author Chinelo Okparanta. Published in 2015, the book tells the story of Ijeoma, a young girl whose small town is in the middle of the Nigerian Civil War. After her father dies in an air raid, her mother sends Ijeoma to live with family and friends in a town far away from the violence.

There she meets Amina, a girl who becomes the object of her affection. Everyone around them disapproves of their relationship and even uses religion as a way to stop Ijeoma from feeling this way.

However, as she grows older, she comes to the realization that if God truly loves everyone, then he must not be excluding homosexual people. This novel touches upon several themes, such as war, religion, the complexities of mother-daughter relationships, and homosexuality. 

21) Ask, Tell by E.J. Noyes

Ask, Tell by E.J. Noyes

Ask, Tell by E.J. Noyes is a romantic, LGBT, military fiction that tells the story of Captain Sabine Fleisher, an Army surgeon who is forced to serve in silence due to the Army’s anti-gay policy of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

While deployed at a combat hospital in Afghanistan, Sabine has to deal with mortality, sleep deprivation, isolation, and a lack of privacy, all of which have a negative impact on her mental health.

Sabine starts developing feelings for Colonel Rebecca Keane, a married career officer who runs the surgical unit, when she starts noticing unspoken cues, like stolen glances.

This look has been praised for its realistic portrayal of hiding your sexuality when in the army and for its great characterization.

22) Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde

Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde

Zami: A New Spelling of My Name is a 1982 book by American poet Audre Lorde. This book gave birth to a new genre of literature that combines mythology, biography, and history. In the book, we follow Audrey Lorde, a black West Indian who grows up in 1930s Harlem.

From a young age, Audrey has had to deal with racism. Her landlord commits suicide because he has to rent his house to a black family, and she is not allowed to eat ice cream because of Jim Crow laws.

Despite such discrimination, she becomes friendly with a group of non-black girls at her high school. Attends college and then settles in Mexico to escape from McCarthyism.

There, she gets introduced to the lesbian bar scene and begins a relationship with several women. In my opinion, this book is a really interesting read as it deals with issues of homophobia, racism, mother-daughter relationships, and McCarthyism.

23) Ash by Malinda Lo

Ash by Malinda Lo

Published in 2009, Ash by Malinda Lo is an award-winning novel. This book is a modern lesbian retelling of Cinderella. Soon after her mother passes away and her father remarries, Ash’s father also dies, leaving her under the guardianship of her cruel stepmother. Her only solace in the world is reading fairy tales that her mother once told her.

One night, she meets Sidhean, a mysterious and sinister fairy prince, while wandering through the woods, and he transports her to the faerie realm.

In the faerie realm, Ash meets Kaisa, with whom she develops a deep friendship and even falls in love. I recommend this book because it is a very romantic and lyrical retelling of Cinderella. 

24) Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anne Peters

Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anne Peters

Published in 2003, Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anne Peters tells the story of Holland, a teenage girl who is discovering her sexuality and her experiences with homophobia.

This contemporary young adult novel deals with the issues of coming into your sexuality and reconciling with yourself. I really enjoyed reading this book because of the characterization and the way the author wrote about young romance and sexual awakening.

25) Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

The second novel on our list by author Jeannette Winterson, Written on the Body, chronicles the affair between an unnamed and ungendered person and a confused yet beloved and complex married woman. It is an intricate and seductive novel that is both captivating and beautifully written.

26) Reservations of the Heart by T.B. Markinson

Reservations of the Heart by T.B. Markinson

Reservations of the Heart by T.B. Markinson is a romantic medical-lesbian fiction novel. Stella Gilbert once had it all—a roaring career and a picture-perfect family until one day her wife left her.

On the other hand, Aurora has been lied to by her family her entire life and wishes to pick up the pieces of her life by taking a job at the local medical school. Both of them are uninterested in dating.

However, when they unexpectedly come together, they discover they share an intense emotional and physical connection. It is a light-hearted and enjoyable romance that is very wholesome.

27) Jericho by Ann McMan

Jericho by Ann McMan

Published in 2010 by Ann McMan, Jericho tells the story of librarian Syd Murphy, who decides to leave her broken marriage by accepting a job in a small town in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia.

At Jericho, she gets drawn into the daily lives of the locals and becomes friends with Maddie Stevenson, a physician who takes over her father’s medical practice. Their friendship soon becomes intense against the backdrop of the beautiful mountains of Virginia.

28) Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera

Published in 2016, Juliet Takes a Breath is a young adult novel by Gabby Rivera. The novel won the 2017 Silver IPPY Award for Best LGBTQ Fiction.

It tells the story of Juliet Milagros Palante, a 19-year-old Latina lesbian from the Bronx who starts interning with a writer. Before going to Portland, she comes out to her family and isn’t sure whether they accept her or not. This queer novel has an interesting contemporary take on lesbian lives and feminism. 

29) The Night Off by Meghan O’Brien

The Night Off by Meghan O’Brien

Published in 2012, The Night Off by Meghan O’Brien tells the story of Emily Parker, an extremely controlling woman who was raised by drug-addicted parents. However, after years of celibacy, she is ready to surrender control by hiring a high-priced escort.

Nat has been an escort for years, and she is great at her job as she helps women fulfill their wildest fantasies. But their night of intense play is more intense, and they can’t help but pursue a connection in the real world. This erotica explores the themes of BDSM and lesbian romance.

30) The Summer of Jordi Perez (And the Best Burger in Los Angeles) by Amy Spalding

The Summer of Jordi Perez (And the Best Burger in Los Angeles) by Amy Spalding

Fashion-obsessed Aby has always been the sidekick in other people’s lives. While everybody else in her life is heading into the world of dating, Aby lands an internship at her favorite boutique. There, she feels attraction toward her fellow intern, Jordi Perez.

As the book progresses, Aby must reconcile with her poor self-image and realize that she is deserving of love and affection just like everybody else. What a great read!

This book is easy to read and follow, even as it covers a lot of issues that young women have to deal with as they grow older and go into the professional world.

31) Women by Chloe Caldwell

Women by Chloe Caldwell

Published in 2018, Women by Chloe Caldwell is a novella that deals with female friendship, the idea of femininity, identity crisis, and sexual confusion. The book follows a woman who discovers that she is attracted to women but doesn’t know whether she is gay, straight, or bi. This book is a rollercoaster of emotions but is written with such precision, wit, and tenderness that it is hard to put it down.

32) Jam on the Vine by LaShonda Barnett

Jam on the Vine by LaShonda Barnett

Published in 2015, Jam on the Wine by LaShonda Barnett is the gripping and captivating story of a black woman, Ivoe Williams, who is obsessed with journalism. Ivoe, is an exceptionally good student. Earns a scholarship and flees the Jim Crow South. Eventually, she and her former teacher and lover, Ona, start running the first female-run African American newspaper. The book is a captivating saga that is an instant classic and gripping from the beginning.

33) The Gifts of the Body by Rebecca Brown

The Gifts of the Body by Rebecca Brown

Published in 1994, The Gifts of the Body by Rebecca Brown is a collection of short stories that are narrated by a caregiver who is tending to several patients who have contracted AIDS or are caring for those afflicted with the virus. The book has a simple, minimalistic style of writing that deals with serious issues and emotions.

34) Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley

Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley

Loving Her by American journalist and author Ann Allen Shockley is a 1974 novel that is considered the first book to feature a black lesbian protagonist and an interracial lesbian relationship. The main protagonist of the book, Renay, is a black musician who is forced to marry Jerome, an abusive man, after she becomes pregnant.

After leaving her destructive marriage, she takes refuge with Terry, the daughter of a wealthy white writer. Soon, they start a romantic and sexual relationship that confronts the sexist, racist, and homophobic prejudices of that time.

35) People in Trouble by Sarah Schulman

People in Trouble by Sarah Schulman

Published in 1990, People in Trouble by Sarah Schulman is set against the backdrop of AIDS in New York City. It tells the story of Kate and Molly, who are having an affair with each other, but Kate still has feelings for her husband, Peter, and wants these two parts of her life to coexist.

This book is extremely gripping from start to finish. It explores a variety of themes such as AIDS activism, female empowerment, heterosexual dynamics, and lesbianism with a lot of consideration and care.

36) One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston

One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston

“One Last Stop” by Casey McQuiston is a captivating contemporary romance novel published in 2021. August Landry, a cynical twenty-three-year-old, moves to New York City for a fresh start and discovers a magical twist during her subway commute. She meets Jane, a captivating woman from the 1970s who is trapped on the subway.

Determined to help Jane find a way back to her own time, August embarks on a journey filled with complex relationships, self-discovery, and the power of love.

McQuiston delivers a heartwarming narrative with witty dialogue, diverse characters, and a celebration of unexpected connections. “One Last Stop” is a touching and enchanting tale that combines romance, time travel, and queer representation.

37) The Girls in 3B by Valeria Taylor

The Girls in 3B by Valeria Taylor

Published in 1959, The Girls in 3B is a work of lesbian pulp fiction by Valerie Taylor. It follows three eighteen-year-old women, Annice, Pat, and Barby, as they move to Chicago and find jobs and an apartment together. They each fall in love with one another and reject the contemporary morality of the 1950s. It also deals with themes of racism, incest, rape, and abortion.

38) When Sparks Fly by Kristen Zimmer

When Sparks Fly by Kristen Zimmer

“When Sparks Fly” by Kristen Zimmer is a captivating lesbian romance novel published in 2021 that follows Amy Perry, a successful marketing executive at a crossroads in her life. Her encounter with Lucy, a free-spirited artist, sparks an intense and immediate connection between them.

As they navigate their relationship, they face challenges that test their commitment, while exploring themes of identity, family, and true happiness.

Zimmer’s heartfelt writing beautifully captures the chemistry and transformative power of love. “When Sparks Fly” is an engaging and touching love story that celebrates connection and self-acceptance.

39) Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur

Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur

“Written in the Stars” by Alexandria Bellefleur is a delightful contemporary romance novel published in 2020. It follows Darcy Lowell, a guarded woman, and Elle Jones, an astrologer, as they embark on a fake dating arrangement that gradually becomes real.

Set during the holiday season in Seattle, the book explores themes of family, self-discovery, and the transformative power of love. Bellefleur’s writing combines humor, chemistry, and tender moments to create an enjoyable and heartwarming narrative.

“Written in the Stars” is a charming story that celebrates unexpected love and the joy of embracing new possibilities.

40) No Rings Attached

No Rings Attached

In Rachel Lacey’s captivating romance, part of the Ms. Right series, reluctant bookseller Lia Harris yearns for love. When she enlists the help of her best friend Rosie to find a fake girlfriend for her brother’s wedding, she meets Grace Poston.

As they navigate a weekend of family, chemistry sparks between them, blurring the lines between real and pretend. “No Rings Attached” is a heartwarming tale of unexpected connections and the possibility of lasting love.

41) The Sea of Light by Jenifer Levin

The Sea of Light by Jenifer Levin

Published in 1994, The Sea of Light by Jenifer Levin tells the story of three women who desire to excel in the highly competitive world of swimming. They all come from different backgrounds and find themselves coming together to heal their souls. It is an extremely erotic yet sensitive portrayal of sexuality, romance, and self-discovery.

42) Lena by Cassie Pruyn

Lena by Cassie Pruyn

Lena is a collection of poems by Cassie Pryun. Through the poems, the readers can experience the physical attraction between lovers, the tenderness, and the rage they feel for each other. Many of the poems have a queer subtext to them. This book is a work of art as it paints, for the readers, a picture of the whirlwind of emotions lovers feel when they fulfill their attraction.

43) Stars Collide by Rachel Lacey

Stars Collide by Rachel Lacey

In Rachel Lacey’s enticing slow-burn romance, two dynamic divas collide on the world’s biggest stage. Eden Sands, a lonely star seeking a career resurgence, hesitates when her team suggests a collaboration with up-and-coming artist Anna Moss. As they rehearse, the two divas discover a shared connection that goes beyond music.

Will their collaboration be a fleeting sensation or the start of a timeless romance? Find out in this captivating tale of passion and ambition.

44) Delilah Green Doesn’t Care by Ashley Herring Blake

Delilah Green Doesn't Care by Ashley Herring Blake

In this witty queer rom-com, photographer Delilah Green reluctantly returns to her hometown for her stepsister’s wedding. There, she reconnects with Claire Sutherland, a single mother and bookstore owner.

As they navigate wedding chaos and unexpected attractions, Delilah and Claire discover a connection neither saw coming. Can they resist the allure or will they give in to undeniable chemistry? Join them on this journey of self-discovery, love, and humor.

45) Astrid Parker Doesn’t Fail by Ashley Herring Blake

Astrid Parker Doesn't Fail by Ashley Herring Blake

In Ashley Herring Blake’s charming romantic comedy, an interior designer named Astrid Parker finds herself renovating more than just a hotel when she clashes with Jordan Everwood, the lead carpenter.

As their dislike for each other evolves into something unexpected, Astrid must choose between the life she’s expected to lead and the one she truly desires. Join them on a journey of love, laughter, and self-discovery in this delightful tale.

For fans of LGBTQ+ genre, Ellen Hopkins’s books are highly recommended as she approaches LGBTQ+ representation in her writing with sensitivity, authenticity, and a commitment to portraying the experiences of these characters in a honest and impactful manner.